Past Courses

Spring 2018 Course Type: Related Course Code: BCRS GU4002 (3pts.) Go to Registrar
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(Dis)Integration in Frames: Race, Ethnicity, and Gender in Yugoslav & Post-Yugoslav Cinema

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This course investigates the complex relationship between aesthetics and ideology in Yugoslav andpost-Yugoslav cinema. It examines the variety of ways in which race, ethnicity, gender inequality andnational identity are approached, constructed, promoted, or critically dissected in film texts from theSocialist Federative Republic of Yugoslavia (SFRY) and its successor states (Bosnia, Croatia, Serbia,FYR Macedonia). The course has four thematic units and is organized chronologically. Unit I providesa historical perspective on the former Yugoslavia during and after World War II. Unit II examineswomen’s lives under Yugoslav state socialism, with particular emphasis on the relationship betweensex and politics. Unit III explores Yugoslavia’s wars of the 1990s. Unit IV focuses on the Romaminority in Yugoslavia. Films by Zafranović, Makavejev, Žilnik, Kusturica, Manchevski, Dragojević,Žbanać. All readings and discussions will be in English.

Spring 2013 Course Type: Joint Course Code: CLEN W4822 (3pts.)

19th Century European Novel

Taught by

Instructor: N. Dames

The European novel in the era of its cultural dominance. Key concerns: the modern metropolis (London, Paris, St. Petersburg); the figures of bourgeois narrative (the parvenu, the adulterer, the adolescent, the consumer) and bourgeois consciousness (nostalgia, ressentiment, sentimentalism, ennui); subjectivity and its relation to class tactics, labor, money, and social upheaval; the impact of journalism, science, economics. Works by Goethe, Stendhal, Balzac, Dickens, Dostoevsky, Flaubert, Turgenev, Zola.

Spring 2018 Course Type: Joint Course Code: CLEN GU4822 (3pts.) Go to Registrar
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19th Century European Novel

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Instructor: Maire Jaanus

The 19th Century European Novel in the field of the emotions and in the cultural context of the major thinkers and the major historical events of the era.We will examine feelings, emotions, and passions in the novels from the perspectives of affective neuroscience, psychoanalysis, and philosophy in order to lay bare more clearly what is known and believed versus what is unknown, ignored or latent about human emotional reality at this time. Reading: Austen, Kleist (novella), Emily Bronte, Dickens, Dostoevsky, Hardy, D.H. Lawrence. No reading outside of the novels will be required on your part. , Further, my aim is to expand our cultural knowledge of the era by including the conceptual contributions and formative ideas of major 19th century thinkers in my lectures on the novels. Optional Reading of short selections from: Kant, Hegel, Feuerbach, Marx, Darwin, Kierkegaard, Nietzsche, and Freud. Those who wish to read and write in a comparative way or on any of the optional writers will be able to do so in lieu of one or, possibly, two novels.

Fall 2012 Course Type: Joint Course Code: CLEN G6707 (3pts.)

20th Century Drama Texts: Law and Media

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Instructor: J. Peters

*See English Department website for application instructions

This course investigates both representations of law in performance, film, and other media, and legal events as, themselves, media performances. In so doing, it explores the impact of film and other media on the shaping of law, and the way in which media attempt to rewrite law, offering an alternative sphere of judgment. Reading a number of theoretical and historical texts, and viewing films, television episodes, and other media texts, we will look at the ways in which the legal subject is both produced and understood through media texts, looking at how these are crucial to ideas about intention, the “reasonable man,” and the normal (cultural, sexual, violent normalities…). We will look at the performance of policing, the trial, punishment, and torture (both live and reflected through media). Along the way, we will look at the way in which film and other media inflect such substantive issues as the nature of murder and culpability, freedom of speech, sex offence, the cultural defense, justice after atrocity. The course will offer a theoretical foundation for thinking about the intersection of law and media, bringing legal, film, performance, and media theory into conversation with one another. More generally, the course will serve as a vehicle for interrogating “law and literature” and “law and media” as sub-disciplines, and for developing techniques for the interpretation of visual, filmed, and live “texts.”

Fall 2013 Course Type: Related Course Code: HIST W4917 (4pts.)

20th Century Ex-Radicals in Perspective

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Instructor: K. Karpozilos

In 1972 the British rock band Tyrannosaurus Rex sang “no, you won’t fool the children of the revolution” implying the commitment of the 1968ers to the revolutionary cause; in 1987 David Horowitz, one of the most prominent figures of 1960s radicalism, publicized his regret for belonging to the “destructive generation”. What happens to revolutionary movements when the “great steam engine of history” seems not to be heading to the desired destination? Main goal of this course is to explore the transformation of revolutionary generations and the connection between disillusioned radicals and the shaping of political and intellectual trends of the 20th century.

Fall 2012 Course Type: Related Course Code: ENGL W4503 (3pts.)

20th Century Poetry: Post Modern Poetry and Poetic

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This class will look at major developments in experimental, innovative, and avant-garde poetry and poetics from 1950 to the present, paying attention to parallel developments in the visual arts. Surrealism, Constructivism, Black Mountain, Minimalism, Conceptualism, L=A=N=G=U=A=G=E, Flarf.

This class will look at major developments in experimental, innovative, and avant-garde poetry and poetics from 1950 to the present, paying attention to parallel developments in the visual arts. Surrealism, Constructivism, Black Mountain, Minimalism, Conceptualism, L=A=N=G=U=A=G=E, Flarf.

Spring 2012 Course Type: Related Course Code: ENGL W4503 (3pts.)

20th Century Poetry: Race, Gender, Poetic Form

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Fall 2016 Course Type: Joint Course Code: CLPS GU4450 (4.00pts.) Go to Registrar
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Adorno, Philosophy, and Psychoanalysis

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After they received news that the Germans had begin to implement the final solution and that their colleague Walter Benjamin had committed suicide, Theodor Adorno and Marx Horkheimer concluded that it was necessary to radicalize their theory so that it would be commensurate with magnitude of the catastrophe that was enveloping Europe. The reformulation of their position involved a move away from the Marxian critique of political economy towards a philosophy of history that took the domination of nature as its central motif as its central motif. That reconstituted theory, articulated in Dialectic of Enlightenment, came to define the Frankfurt School during its classical phase.

One of the resources that the two Critical Theorists drew on to accomplish this radicalization was Freud’s cultural writings. Along with the works of Nietzsche, Weber, Mauss and other’s, they used Freud’s texts to formulate a depth-psychological and depth-anthropological critique of civilization which they entitled “The Primal History of Subjectivity.”

After the war, Horkheimer moved in a different direction, but Adorno continued to work within and elaborate the theoretical framework they had articulated in Dialectic of Enlightenment. In Adorno’s thinking philosophical and psychoanalytic concepts thoroughly interpenetrate one another. Indeed, many of his most important philosophical notions — for example, the predominance of the object, the addenda, non-identity, constellations, and mimesis — would have been unthinkable without his appropriation of Freud. In this class, we will examine the thorough interdependence of philosophy and psychoanalysis in the formation Adorno’s distinctive brand of Negative Dialectics.

Spring 2018 Course Type: Joint Course Code: CLIA GU4021 (3pts.) Go to Registrar
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Adriatic Romanticisms

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Prerequisites: Knowledge of Italian desirable but not necessary

This interdisciplinary seminar will study Romanticism as a literary trend, as much as a historical phenomenon and a life attitude. Romanticism is viewed here as the sum of the different answers to the sense of insecurity, social alienation and loneliness, provoked by the changing and frail world of the end of the eighteenth and the beginning of the nineteenth century. We will investigate the Romantic ideology in relation to the trans-Adriatic world of Italy and Greece, an area that entered modernity with the particular lure and burden of antiquity, as well as through revolutionary upheaval. Students will be invited to read authors like Vittorio Alfieri, Ugo Foscolo, Silvio Pellico, Giacomo Leopardi, Alessandro Manzoni, Massimo d’Azeglio, and to reflect on themes such as Nostalgia and Nationalism, the Discovery of the Middle Ages, the Historical Novel, the Invention of Popular Tradition, the Fragmented Self, Autobiographical and Travel Writing, the Brigand Cult, Hellenism, Philhellenism, Orientalism and Balkanism, and others.

Spring 2014 Course Type: CPLS Course Code: CPLS X3510 (4pts.)

Advanced Workshop in Translation

Taught by

Instructor: P. Connor

Prerequisites: CPLT BC 3110 Introduction to Translation Studies is a recommended prerequisite. A deep immersion in the theory and practice of translation with a focus on translating into English. The first half of the course is devoted to discussing readings in the history of translation theory while translating brief practical exercises; in the second half, translation projects are submitted to the class for critical discussion. The foreign texts for these projects, chosen in consultation with the instructor, will be humanistic, not only literature as conventionally defined (prose fiction and poetry, memoir and travel writing), but also the gamut of text types in the human sciences, including philosophy, history, and ethnography. The aim is not just to translate, but to think deeply about translating, to develop writing practices by drawing on the resources of theory, past and present, and by examining translations written by professionals. Enrollment in this workshop is limited to 12 students. Admission into the class is by permission of the instructor. CPLT BC 3011 “Introduction to Translation Studies” is a recommended prerequisite, plus, normally, two advanced courses beyond the language requirement in the language from which you intend to translate. Preference will be given to seniors and to comparative literature majors. Please submit an application to pconnor@barnard.edu by 30 November 2013 with the following information: your name, year of graduation, and major; a list of courses you have taken in the language from which you intend to translate; any other pertinent courses you have taken; any further relevant information relating to your language ability; a brief (max 300 word) explanation of why you wish to take this workshop. You will be notified of admission by 18 December. N.B. This course cannot be substituted for the required Senior Seminar CPLS BC3997