Past Courses

Spring 2013 Course Type: Joint Course Code: CLEN W4822 (3pts.)

19th Century European Novel

Taught by

Instructor: N. Dames

The European novel in the era of its cultural dominance. Key concerns: the modern metropolis (London, Paris, St. Petersburg); the figures of bourgeois narrative (the parvenu, the adulterer, the adolescent, the consumer) and bourgeois consciousness (nostalgia, ressentiment, sentimentalism, ennui); subjectivity and its relation to class tactics, labor, money, and social upheaval; the impact of journalism, science, economics. Works by Goethe, Stendhal, Balzac, Dickens, Dostoevsky, Flaubert, Turgenev, Zola.

Fall 2012 Course Type: Joint Course Code: CLEN G6707 (3pts.)

20th Century Drama Texts: Law and Media

Taught by

Instructor: J. Peters

*See English Department website for application instructions

This course investigates both representations of law in performance, film, and other media, and legal events as, themselves, media performances. In so doing, it explores the impact of film and other media on the shaping of law, and the way in which media attempt to rewrite law, offering an alternative sphere of judgment. Reading a number of theoretical and historical texts, and viewing films, television episodes, and other media texts, we will look at the ways in which the legal subject is both produced and understood through media texts, looking at how these are crucial to ideas about intention, the “reasonable man,” and the normal (cultural, sexual, violent normalities…). We will look at the performance of policing, the trial, punishment, and torture (both live and reflected through media). Along the way, we will look at the way in which film and other media inflect such substantive issues as the nature of murder and culpability, freedom of speech, sex offence, the cultural defense, justice after atrocity. The course will offer a theoretical foundation for thinking about the intersection of law and media, bringing legal, film, performance, and media theory into conversation with one another. More generally, the course will serve as a vehicle for interrogating “law and literature” and “law and media” as sub-disciplines, and for developing techniques for the interpretation of visual, filmed, and live “texts.”

Fall 2013 Course Type: Related Course Code: HIST W4917 (4pts.)

20th Century Ex-Radicals in Perspective

Taught by

Instructor: K. Karpozilos

In 1972 the British rock band Tyrannosaurus Rex sang “no, you won’t fool the children of the revolution” implying the commitment of the 1968ers to the revolutionary cause; in 1987 David Horowitz, one of the most prominent figures of 1960s radicalism, publicized his regret for belonging to the “destructive generation”. What happens to revolutionary movements when the “great steam engine of history” seems not to be heading to the desired destination? Main goal of this course is to explore the transformation of revolutionary generations and the connection between disillusioned radicals and the shaping of political and intellectual trends of the 20th century.

Fall 2012 Course Type: Related Course Code: ENGL W4503 (3pts.)

20th Century Poetry: Post Modern Poetry and Poetic

Taught by

This class will look at major developments in experimental, innovative, and avant-garde poetry and poetics from 1950 to the present, paying attention to parallel developments in the visual arts. Surrealism, Constructivism, Black Mountain, Minimalism, Conceptualism, L=A=N=G=U=A=G=E, Flarf.

This class will look at major developments in experimental, innovative, and avant-garde poetry and poetics from 1950 to the present, paying attention to parallel developments in the visual arts. Surrealism, Constructivism, Black Mountain, Minimalism, Conceptualism, L=A=N=G=U=A=G=E, Flarf.

Spring 2012 Course Type: Related Course Code: ENGL W4503 (3pts.)

20th Century Poetry: Race, Gender, Poetic Form

Taught by
Spring 2014 Course Type: CPLS Course Code: CPLS X3510 (4pts.)

Advanced Workshop in Translation

Taught by

Instructor: P. Connor

Prerequisites: CPLT BC 3110 Introduction to Translation Studies is a recommended prerequisite. A deep immersion in the theory and practice of translation with a focus on translating into English. The first half of the course is devoted to discussing readings in the history of translation theory while translating brief practical exercises; in the second half, translation projects are submitted to the class for critical discussion. The foreign texts for these projects, chosen in consultation with the instructor, will be humanistic, not only literature as conventionally defined (prose fiction and poetry, memoir and travel writing), but also the gamut of text types in the human sciences, including philosophy, history, and ethnography. The aim is not just to translate, but to think deeply about translating, to develop writing practices by drawing on the resources of theory, past and present, and by examining translations written by professionals. Enrollment in this workshop is limited to 12 students. Admission into the class is by permission of the instructor. CPLT BC 3011 “Introduction to Translation Studies” is a recommended prerequisite, plus, normally, two advanced courses beyond the language requirement in the language from which you intend to translate. Preference will be given to seniors and to comparative literature majors. Please submit an application to pconnor@barnard.edu by 30 November 2013 with the following information: your name, year of graduation, and major; a list of courses you have taken in the language from which you intend to translate; any other pertinent courses you have taken; any further relevant information relating to your language ability; a brief (max 300 word) explanation of why you wish to take this workshop. You will be notified of admission by 18 December. N.B. This course cannot be substituted for the required Senior Seminar CPLS BC3997

Spring 2013 Course Type: CPLS Course Code: CPLS X3510 (3pts.)

Advanced Workshop in Translation

Taught by

Instructor: P. Connor

A deep immersion in the theory and practice of translation with a focus on translating into English. The first half of the course is devoted to discussing readings in the history of translation theory while translating brief practical exercises; in the second half, translation projects are submitted to the class for critical discussion. The foreign texts for these projects, chosen in consultation with the instructor, will be humanistic, not only literature as conventionally defined (prose fiction and poetry, memoir and travel writing), but also the gamut of text types in the human sciences, including philosophy, history, and ethnography. The aim is not just to translate, but to think deeply about translating, to develop writing practices by drawing on the resources of theory, past and present, and by examining translations written by professionals.

Enrollment in this workshop is limited to 12 students. Admission into the class is by permission of the instructor. CPLT BC 3011 “Introduction to Translation Studies” is a recommended prerequisite, plus, normally, two advanced courses beyond the language requirement in the language from which you intend to translate. Preference will be given to seniors and to comparative literature majors. Please submit an application to pconnor@barnard.edu by 30 November 2012 with the following information: your name, year of graduation, and major; a list of courses you have taken in the language from which you intend to translate; any other pertinent courses you have taken; any further relevant information relating to your language ability; a brief (max 300 word) explanation of why you wish to take this workshop. You will be notified of admission by 18 December.

Spring 2012 Course Type: CPLS Course Code: CPLS X3510 (4pts.)

Advanced Workshop in Translation

Taught by

Instructor: L. Venuti

A deep immersion in the theory and practice of translation with a focus on translating into English. The first half of the course is devoted to discussing readings in the history of translation theory while translating brief practical exercises; in the second half, translation projects are submitted to the class for critical discussion. The foreign texts for these projects, chosen in consultation with the instructor, will be humanistic, not only literature as conventionally defined (prose fiction and poetry, memoir and travel writing), but also the gamut of text types in the human sciences, including philosophy, history, and ethnography. The aim is not just to translate, but to think deeply about translating, to develop writing practices by drawing on the resources of theory, past and present, and by examining translations written by professionals. Entry to the class is by permission of the instructor through an email interview: LVenuti@temple.edu

Spring 2016 Course Type: Joint Course Code: CPLS X3510 (4pts.) Go to Registrar
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Advanced Workshop Translation

Taught by

Instructors: Peter Connor and Emily Sun

Prerequisites: CPLT BC 3110 – Introduction to Translation Studies is a recommended prerequisite. A deep immersion in the theory and practice of translation with a focus on translating into English.

The first half of the course is devoted to discussing readings in the history of translation theory while translating brief practical exercises; in the second half, translation projects are submitted to the class for critical discussion. The foreign texts for these projects, chosen in consultation with the instructor, will be humanistic, not only literature as conventionally defined (prose fiction and poetry, memoir and travel writing), but also the gamut of text types in the human sciences, including philosophy, history, and ethnography. The aim is not just to translate, but to think deeply about translating, to develop writing practices by drawing on the resources of theory, past and present, and by examining translations written by professionals.

In the spring of 2016, the workshop will be offered in two sections by Professor Peter Connor and Professor Emily Sun. The sections will share most of the common readings in the history of translation theory, but Professor Sun’s section will emphasize issues specific to translating East Asia.

Enrollment in each workshop is limited to 12 students. Admission into the class is by permission of the instructor. CPLT BC 3011 “Introduction to Translation Studies” is a recommended prerequisite, plus, normally, two advanced courses beyond the language requirement in the language from which you intend to translate. Preference will be given to seniors and to comparative literature majors.

Please Email pconnor@barnard.edu by 1 December 2015 with the following information:

  • Name, year of graduation, major, college (BC, CU, etc.)
  • a list of courses you have taken in the language from which you intend to translate
  • any other pertinent courses you have taken
  • a brief (max 300 word) statement explaining why you wish to take the workshop (this statement is not required if you have taken or are taking CPLT BC3110 Intro to Translation Studies).
Fall 2011 Course Type: Joint Course Code: CLGR W4207 (3pts.)

Aesthetics Under Siege: Frankfurt School

Taught by

This lecture course works with an expanded notion of the Frankfurt School. The Central figures treated are Siegfried Kracauer, Waler Benjamin, and Theodor W. Adorno, but readings also include György Lukács, Ernst Bloch, Bertolt Brecht, and some others. It focuses on aesthetic and political issues in high and mass culture debates in Europe, the Soviet Union, and the U.S. then and today. All readings will be contextualized in relationship to modernization, Marxism, and National Socialism in the first half of the past century. Metropolitan modernism, realism, the historical avant-garde, and mass media culture will be recurring themes throughout the semester which ends with a coda on the culture of the Cold War.