Past Courses

Fall Course Type: CPLS Course Code: CLPS GU4520 (4pts.) Go to Registrar
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Is it reassuring that no philosophical treatise ‘On the Mother’ seems to have been written in the history of occidental thought? Should we be relieved that nothing this violently direct, obscene, on the mother, seems to have been produced? Or should we rather be disturbed that ‘thinking mothers’ has not been a declared task for the mostly male-bonding and father-bound transgenerational band called ‘thinkers’? Would thinking, as philosophical thinking which in one of its traditional senses calls for thinking the essence of ‘a thing’, not require to think motherhood, maternity, or the Mother as the essence of mothers? Would thinking mothers in their supposed essence as giving birth, bringing to life, as a singular (mother) in relation to a singular (progeny), kill the mothers, each and every single one, by thinking that essence which they all would be supposed to share? Does the mother not allow us to think? Is thinking matricidal? Does the essence of mothers lie in not thinking the essence of mothers? Are mothers and thinkers engaged in a struggle for life and death, like two rivaling twins outside of themselves in a womb we have to invent in order to imagine it? Where can we find room to speculate a little differently facing the mirror of thinking mothers? Do we have to resort to psychoanalysis and literature in order to un-think these questions?

Spring 2018 Course Type: Related Course Code: BCRS GU4002 (3pts.) Go to Registrar
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(Dis)Integration in Frames: Race, Ethnicity, and Gender in Yugoslav & Post-Yugoslav Cinema

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This course investigates the complex relationship between aesthetics and ideology in Yugoslav and post-Yugoslav cinema. It examines the variety of ways in which race, ethnicity, gender inequality and national identity are approached, constructed, promoted, or critically dissected in film texts from the Socialist Federative Republic of Yugoslavia (SFRY) and its successor states (Bosnia, Croatia, Serbia,FYR Macedonia). The course has four thematic units and is organized chronologically. Unit I providesa historical perspective on the former Yugoslavia during and after World War II. Unit II examines women’s lives under Yugoslav state socialism, with particular emphasis on the relationship between sex and politics. Unit III explores Yugoslavia’s wars of the 1990s. Unit IV focuses on the Romaminority in Yugoslavia. Films by Zafranović, Makavejev, Žilnik, Kusturica, Manchevski, Dragojević,Žbanać. All readings and discussions will be in English.

Spring 2019 Course Type: CPLS Course Code: CPLS 84100 (3pts.)

(Y)our Longer Life

Taught by

Instructors: Dana March & Linda Md Fried

People are living 30 years longer than we did 100 years ago. We have created a whole new stage of life. How do we prepare to benefit from our longer lives? What can you do in your own life? This course explores the personal, population, community, and societal dimensions of our now-longer lives, of aging itself, and the role of health and societal design in the experience of aging. The course examines the meaning of aging and the attendant expectations, myths, fears, and realities. The course examines an aging society as a public health success, the potential for building health futures, the health plan you want to be healthy in old age, and the potential for longer lives and how we unlock it. It addresses the roles public health currently plays and can play in shaping a society for an aging population. The course explores how a public health system—indeed, a society—optimized for an aging population stands to benefit all. The course also examines the physical, cognitive, and psychological aspects of aging, the exposures across our lives that affect these, the attributes and challenges of aging, keys to successful aging, and aging around the globe. The culminating project will design elements of our society that are needed to support the opportunity of having longer lives. This course comprises lectures, class discussions, individual assignments, in-class case activities, and a group project in which students shall take an active role. You will be responsible for regular preparatory assignments, writing assignments, one group project, and attending course sessions. Please note: GSAS students must receive permission from their department before registering for this course.

Spring 2013 Course Type: Joint Course Code: CLEN W4822 (3pts.)

19th Century European Novel

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Instructor: N. Dames

The European novel in the era of its cultural dominance. Key concerns: the modern metropolis (London, Paris, St. Petersburg); the figures of bourgeois narrative (the parvenu, the adulterer, the adolescent, the consumer) and bourgeois consciousness (nostalgia, ressentiment, sentimentalism, ennui); subjectivity and its relation to class tactics, labor, money, and social upheaval; the impact of journalism, science, economics. Works by Goethe, Stendhal, Balzac, Dickens, Dostoevsky, Flaubert, Turgenev, Zola.

Spring 2018 Course Type: Joint Course Code: CLEN GU4822 (3pts.) Go to Registrar
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19th Century European Novel

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The European novel in the era of its cultural dominance. Key concerns: the modern metropolis (London, Paris, St. Petersburg); the figures of bourgeois narrative (parvenus, adulterers, adolescents, consumers) and bourgeois consciousness (nostalgia, ressentiment, sentimentalism, ennui); the impact of journalism, science, economics. Authors to be drawn from: Goethe, Stendhal, Balzac, Dickens, Tolstoy, Dostoevsky, Flaubert, Turgenev, Zola.

Fall 2018 Course Type: CPLS Course Code: CLEN GU4822 (3pts.) Go to Registrar
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19TH CENTURY EUROPEAN NOVEL

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The 19th Century European Novel in the field of the emotions and in the cultural context of the major thinkers and the major historical events of the era.We will examine feelings, emotions, and passions in the novels from the perspectives of affective neuroscience, psychoanalysis, and philosophy in order to lay bare more clearly what is known and believed versus what is unknown, ignored or latent about human emotional reality at this time. Reading: Austen, Kleist (novella), Emily Bronte, Dickens, Dostoevsky, Hardy, D.H. Lawrence. No reading outside of the novels will be required on your part. , Further, my aim is to expand our cultural knowledge of the era by including the conceptual contributions and formative ideas of major 19th century thinkers in my lectures on the novels. Optional Reading of short selections from: Kant, Hegel, Feuerbach, Marx, Darwin, Kierkegaard, Nietzsche, and Freud. Those who wish to read and write in a comparative way or on any of the optional writers will be able to do so in lieu of one or, possibly, two novels.

Fall 2012 Course Type: Joint Course Code: CLEN G6707 (3pts.)

20th Century Drama Texts: Law and Media

Taught by

Instructor: J. Peters

*See English Department website for application instructions

This course investigates both representations of law in performance, film, and other media, and legal events as, themselves, media performances. In so doing, it explores the impact of film and other media on the shaping of law, and the way in which media attempt to rewrite law, offering an alternative sphere of judgment. Reading a number of theoretical and historical texts, and viewing films, television episodes, and other media texts, we will look at the ways in which the legal subject is both produced and understood through media texts, looking at how these are crucial to ideas about intention, the “reasonable man,” and the normal (cultural, sexual, violent normalities…). We will look at the performance of policing, the trial, punishment, and torture (both live and reflected through media). Along the way, we will look at the way in which film and other media inflect such substantive issues as the nature of murder and culpability, freedom of speech, sex offence, the cultural defense, justice after atrocity. The course will offer a theoretical foundation for thinking about the intersection of law and media, bringing legal, film, performance, and media theory into conversation with one another. More generally, the course will serve as a vehicle for interrogating “law and literature” and “law and media” as sub-disciplines, and for developing techniques for the interpretation of visual, filmed, and live “texts.”

Fall 2013 Course Type: Related Course Code: HIST W4917 (4pts.)

20th Century Ex-Radicals in Perspective

Taught by

Instructor: K. Karpozilos

In 1972 the British rock band Tyrannosaurus Rex sang “no, you won’t fool the children of the revolution” implying the commitment of the 1968ers to the revolutionary cause; in 1987 David Horowitz, one of the most prominent figures of 1960s radicalism, publicized his regret for belonging to the “destructive generation”. What happens to revolutionary movements when the “great steam engine of history” seems not to be heading to the desired destination? Main goal of this course is to explore the transformation of revolutionary generations and the connection between disillusioned radicals and the shaping of political and intellectual trends of the 20th century.

Fall 2012 Course Type: Related Course Code: ENGL W4503 (3pts.)

20th Century Poetry: Post Modern Poetry and Poetic

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This class will look at major developments in experimental, innovative, and avant-garde poetry and poetics from 1950 to the present, paying attention to parallel developments in the visual arts. Surrealism, Constructivism, Black Mountain, Minimalism, Conceptualism, L=A=N=G=U=A=G=E, Flarf.

This class will look at major developments in experimental, innovative, and avant-garde poetry and poetics from 1950 to the present, paying attention to parallel developments in the visual arts. Surrealism, Constructivism, Black Mountain, Minimalism, Conceptualism, L=A=N=G=U=A=G=E, Flarf.

Spring 2012 Course Type: Related Course Code: ENGL W4503 (3pts.)

20th Century Poetry: Race, Gender, Poetic Form

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