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Spring 2018 Course Type: Related Course Code: BCRS GU4002 (3pts.) Go to Registrar
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(Dis)Integration in Frames: Race, Ethnicity, and Gender in Yugoslav & Post-Yugoslav Cinema

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This course investigates the complex relationship between aesthetics and ideology in Yugoslav andpost-Yugoslav cinema. It examines the variety of ways in which race, ethnicity, gender inequality andnational identity are approached, constructed, promoted, or critically dissected in film texts from theSocialist Federative Republic of Yugoslavia (SFRY) and its successor states (Bosnia, Croatia, Serbia,FYR Macedonia). The course has four thematic units and is organized chronologically. Unit I providesa historical perspective on the former Yugoslavia during and after World War II. Unit II examineswomen’s lives under Yugoslav state socialism, with particular emphasis on the relationship betweensex and politics. Unit III explores Yugoslavia’s wars of the 1990s. Unit IV focuses on the Romaminority in Yugoslavia. Films by Zafranović, Makavejev, Žilnik, Kusturica, Manchevski, Dragojević,Žbanać. All readings and discussions will be in English.

Spring 2018 Course Type: Joint Course Code: CLIA GU4021 (3pts.) Go to Registrar
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Adriatic Romanticisms

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Prerequisites: Knowledge of Italian desirable but not necessary

This interdisciplinary seminar will study Romanticism as a literary trend, as much as a historical phenomenon and a life attitude. Romanticism is viewed here as the sum of the different answers to the sense of insecurity, social alienation and loneliness, provoked by the changing and frail world of the end of the eighteenth and the beginning of the nineteenth century. We will investigate the Romantic ideology in relation to the trans-Adriatic world of Italy and Greece, an area that entered modernity with the particular lure and burden of antiquity, as well as through revolutionary upheaval. Students will be invited to read authors like Vittorio Alfieri, Ugo Foscolo, Silvio Pellico, Giacomo Leopardi, Alessandro Manzoni, Massimo d’Azeglio, and to reflect on themes such as Nostalgia and Nationalism, the Discovery of the Middle Ages, the Historical Novel, the Invention of Popular Tradition, the Fragmented Self, Autobiographical and Travel Writing, the Brigand Cult, Hellenism, Philhellenism, Orientalism and Balkanism, and others.

Spring 2018 Course Type: CPLS Course Code: CPLS BC3510 (4pts.) Go to Registrar
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Advanced Workshop in Translation

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Prerequisites: CPLT BC 3110 – Introduction to Translation Studies is a recommended prerequisite. A deep immersion in the theory and practice of translation with a focus on translating into English. The first half of the course is devoted to discussing readings in the history of translation theory while translating brief practical exercises; in the second half, translation projects are submitted to the class for critical discussion. The foreign texts for these projects, chosen in consultation with the instructor, will be humanistic, not only literature as conventionally defined (prose fiction and poetry, memoir and travel writing), but also the gamut of text types in the human sciences, including philosophy, history, and ethnography. The aim is not just to translate, but to think deeply about translating, to develop writing practices by drawing on the resources of theory, past and present, and by examining translations written by professionals. In the spring of 2016, the workshop will be offered in two sections by Professor Peter Connor and Professor Emily Sun. The sections will share most of the common readings in the history of translation theory, but Professor Sun’s section will emphasize issues specific to translating East Asia. Enrollment in each workshop is limited to 12 students. Admission into the class is by permission of the instructor. CPLT BC 3011 “Introduction to Translation Studies” is a recommended prerequisite, plus, normally, two advanced courses beyond the language requirement in the language from which you intend to translate. Preference will be given to seniors and to comparative literature majors. Please Email pconnor@barnard.edu by 1 December 2015 with the following information: Name, year of graduation, major, college (BC, CU, etc.); a list of courses you have taken in the language from which you intend to translate; any other pertinent courses you have taken; a brief (max 300 word) statement explaining why you wish to take the workshop (this statement is not required if you have taken or are taking CPLT BC3110 Intro to Translation Studies).

Fall Course Type: Joint Course Code: CLME UN3221 (4pts.) Go to Registrar
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ARABIC LITERATURE AS WORLD LITERATURE

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Instructor: Sarah Bin Tyeer

SEMINAR Course Description This advanced undergraduate seminar focuses on Arabic literature in the world, as World Literature. The focus will be particularly on pre-modern Arabic literary works that traveled and circulated and were adapted to and acquired individual meanings in different cultures. We will look at how literary works travel and circulate through its fusion with regional concepts, or even take on new meanings at different times and places. Admittedly, also, we will look into the strengths, weaknesses, and criticism surrounding World Literature.

Fall 2017 Course Type: Joint Course Code: CLME UN3928 (3pts.) Go to Registrar
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Arabic Prison Writing

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This course studies the genealogy of the prison in Arab culture as manifested in memoirs, narratives, and poems. These cut across a vast temporal and spatial swathe, covering selections from the Quran, Sufi narratives from al-Halllaj oeuvre, poetry by prisoners of war: classical, medieval, and modern. It also studies modern narratives by women prisoners and political prisoners, and narratives that engage with these issues. Arabic prison writing is studied against other genealogies of this prism, especially in the West, to map out the birth of prison, its institutionalization, mechanism, and role. All readings for the course are in English translations.

Spring 2018 Course Type: Joint Course Code: MDES GU4237 (4pts.) Go to Registrar
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Arabs, Jews, and Arab Jews

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In modern times, the names and figures “Arab” and “Jew” have had a history of resemblance (19th century philologists and biblical scholars have often related to both “Semites” and discussed them interchangeably), followed by a history of setting the two figures apart in radical opposition. This spilt solidified in 1948, when Israel was established as a Jewish state on the ruins of Palestine, with close to 800,000 Palestinian refugees exiled from their homes. Within this context “Jew” and “Arab” became radically opposed political and cultural figures. While this remains the case for several decades within Israel, resulting in an active suppression of “Mizrahi” (Jews from the Levant and the Maghreb) culture, memory, and affiliations, the past two decades have been characterized by a boom in the production of Mizrahi art, music, and literature as well as a great development of a political and epistemological position that refuses to set “Jew” and “Arab” apart. In this course we will engage a broad theoretical spectrum of texts dealing with questions of memory, representation, hegemonic (state) power and the ability of counter-hegemonic cultural forces to de-colonialize structures of power. We will accompany these general theoretical readings with historical, political and literary texts by and about “Arabs,” and “Jews” that is by and about the relationship between these two figures, which in many cases, as we shall see, is not really two figures, but one. Finally we will explore the cultural and political meaning behind these literary productions and other projects. Are they mainly about the reconstructing the past? Reviving otherwise lost memories? Or should they be read as futuristic texts, invested in recovering the past bonds between “Jew” and “Arab” (often within the self) for the sake of creating an alternative future?

Fall 2017 Course Type: Joint Course Code: ARCH A4780 (3pts.) Go to Registrar
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Architecture + Human Rights

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This seminar will investigate contemporary trajectories of architecturalresearch and practice that intersect with questions of human rights, notions of democraticpublic space, and spatial politics. We will ask what role the discipline plays (or mightplay) in current debates over questions of political representation, defense, theorganization of territory, surveillance, warfare, political conflict, and cultural heritage aswell as in questions of citizenship, diaspora, humanitarian intervention, and justice.These questions mark out a profoundly fascinating and highly complicated field of study,and there is a growing body of important literature pertaining to them. The seminar willprovide a forum for considering aspects of this literature and practices associated with it,as well as for identifying new lines of research and further critical prospects for thediscipline of architecture.

Spring 2018 Course Type: Related Course Code: AHIS GR8432 (4pts.) Go to Registrar
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Art/Theory in a Global Context

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Instructor: John Rajchman

In this Seminar, we will explore the question of ‘globalization’ in the arts, and the new debates to which it has given rise, since 1989, or the dawn of the 21st century. It is open to qualified students in any discipline concerned with such questions. While it is focused on visual arts and arts institutions, it involves other ‘media’ — film, photography, public art, literature. In conjunction with exhibitions at the Guggenheim and the Met Breuer opening this Spring, we will pay special attention to contemporary art in China and Brazil, but the Seminar welcomes students with interests in other areas or geographies as well. It is intended as a kind of open laboratory and forum about the role that critical theory has played and may yet play in this field, still in the making. Thus the challenges to ‘Euro-centrism’ and the associated problem of ‘critical translation’ will be discussed in terms of the overriding question: what is ‘transnational citizenship’ today, what role might art and critical thought play in it?

Fall 2017 Course Type: Joint Course Code: CLEN GU4560 (3pts.) Go to Registrar
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Backgrounds to Contemporary Theory

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[Lecture]. In chapter 4 of Hegel’s Phenomenology of Mind, a story is told about a confrontation between a Lord (Herr) and a Bondsman (Knecht). The story conveys how consciousness is born. This story, subsequently better known as the confrontation between Master and Slave, has been appropriated and revised again and again in figures like Marx and Nietzsche, Sartre, De Beauvoir, and Fanon, Freud and Lacan, Emmanuel Levinas, Carl Schmitt, Slavoj Zizek, and Judith Butler. The premise of this course is that one can understand much of which is (and isn’t) most significant and interesting in contemporary cultural theory by coming to an understanding Hegel’s argument, and tracing the paths by which thinkers revise and return to it as well as some of the arguments around it. There are no prerequisites, but the material is strenuous, and students will clearly have an easier time if they start out with some idea of what the thinkers above are doing and why. Helpful preparatory readings might include Genevieve Lloyd, The Man of Reason: “Male” and “Female” in Western Philosophy and Judith Butler, Gender Trouble. Requirements: For undergraduates: two short papers (6-8 pages). For graduate students, either two short papers or one longer paper (12-15 pages).

Spring 2018 Course Type: CPLS Course Code: CPLS GU4201 (4pts.) Go to Registrar
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Basic Concepts: Post-Freudian Thoughts

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This course examines psychoanalytic movements that are viewed either as post-Freudian in theory or as emerging after Freud’s time. The course begins by considering the ways Freud’s cultural and historical surround, as well as the wartime diaspora of the European psychoanalytic community, shaped Freudian and post-Freudian thought. It then focuses on significant schools and theories of psychoanalysis that were developed from the mid 20th century to the present. Through readings of key texts and selected case studies, it explores theorists’ challenges to classical thought and technique, and their reconfigurations, modernizations, and total rejections of central Freudian ideas. The course concludes by looking at contemporary theorists’ moves to integrate notions of culture, concepts of trauma, and findings from neuroscience and attachment research into the psychoanalytic frame.