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Spring 2019 Course Type: CPLS Course Code: CPLS 84100 (3pts.)

(Y)our Longer Life

Taught by

Instructors: Dana March & Linda Md Fried

People are living 30 years longer than we did 100 years ago. We have created a whole new stage of life. How do we prepare to benefit from our longer lives? What can you do in your own life? This course explores the personal, population, community, and societal dimensions of our now-longer lives, of aging itself, and the role of health and societal design in the experience of aging. The course examines the meaning of aging and the attendant expectations, myths, fears, and realities. The course examines an aging society as a public health success, the potential for building health futures, the health plan you want to be healthy in old age, and the potential for longer lives and how we unlock it. It addresses the roles public health currently plays and can play in shaping a society for an aging population. The course explores how a public health system—indeed, a society—optimized for an aging population stands to benefit all. The course also examines the physical, cognitive, and psychological aspects of aging, the exposures across our lives that affect these, the attributes and challenges of aging, keys to successful aging, and aging around the globe. The culminating project will design elements of our society that are needed to support the opportunity of having longer lives. This course comprises lectures, class discussions, individual assignments, in-class case activities, and a group project in which students shall take an active role. You will be responsible for regular preparatory assignments, writing assignments, one group project, and attending course sessions. Please note: GSAS students must receive permission from their department before registering for this course.

Spring 2019 Course Type: CPLS Course Code: CLGR GU4280 (3pts.) Go to Registrar
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21ST-CENTURY TRANSNATIONAL CINEMA

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The so-called refugee crisis has drawn worldwide attention to Europe’s heated debates about immigration and identity, but questions of national and transnational belonging have shaped the continent throughout the last few decades, against the backdrops of sociopolitical Europeanization and socioeconomic globalization. While political discourse has become increasingly polarized with the ascent of anti-immigrant populist forces, contemporary European cinema has developed a range of rich imaginations. In different genres along with more experimental formats, fiction films (as well as documentaries) probe diverging perspectives, unexpected complications, fresh angles or bold responses in tracing experiences of migration and the possibilities of living together in in the twenty-first century. The course explores these rich scenarios by facilitating close looks at individual films in institutional and socio-political context. The guiding notion of transnationalism is developed descriptively as acknowledging contemporary production and distribution conditions, and probed conceptually in dialogue with part competing, part overlapping paradigms such as postcolonialism and cosmopolitanism, intercultural or diasporic and world cinema. We also read some film theory to sharpen our (multisensorial) reading skills. The selection of films reflects the course’s institutional location in the German department while crossing borders in different directions (that is, roughly half of the films are German-language or otherwise significantly associated with Germany). This course is taught in English. All readings will be available on Courseworks in pdf-Format. I will aim to make the films available for streaming on the course website also.

Spring 2019 Course Type: CPLS Course Code: CLME GU4225 (4pts.)

ARABIC LITERARY PRODUCTION

Taught by
Spring 2019 Course Type: CPLS Course Code: CLME UN3928 (3pts.)

ARABIC PRISON WRITING

Taught by

This course studies the genealogy of the prison in Arab culture as manifested in memoirs, narratives, and poems. These cut across a vast temporal and spatial swathe, covering selections from the Quran, Sufi narratives from al-Halllaj oeuvre, poetry by prisoners of war: classical, medieval, and modern. It also studies modern narratives by women prisoners and political prisoners, and narratives that engage with these issues. Arabic prison writing is studied against other genealogies of this prism, especially in the West, to map out the birth of prison, its institutionalization, mechanism, and role. All readings for the course are in English translations.

Spring 2019 Course Type: CPLS Course Code: CPLS GR8342 (4.00pts.) Go to Registrar
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ART/THEORY IN A GLOBAL CONTEXT

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In this Seminar, we will explore the question of ‘globalization’ in the arts, and the new debates to which it has given rise, since 1989, or at the dawn of the 21st century. It is open to qualified students in any discipline concerned with such questions. While it is focused on visual arts and arts institutions, it involves other ‘media’ — film, photography, public art, literature. In conjunction with exhibitions at the Guggenheim and the Met Breuer opening this Spring, we will pay special attention to contemporary art in China and Brazil, but the Seminar welcomes students with interests in other areas or geographies as well. It is intended as a kind of open laboratory and forum about the role that critical theory has played and may yet play in this field, still in the making. Thus the challenges to ‘Euro-centrism’ and the associated problem of ‘critical translation’ will be discussed in terms of the over-riding question: what is ‘transnational citizenship’ today, what role might art and critical thought play in it.

Spring 2019 Course Type: CPLS Course Code: CPLS GU4101 (3pts.) Go to Registrar
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BALKAN AS A METAPHOR

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Spring 2019 Course Type: CPLS Course Code: CPLS GU4201 (4pts.) Go to Registrar
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BASIC CONCEPTS-POST-FREUD THought

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This course examines psychoanalytic movements that are viewed either as post-Freudian in theory or as emerging after Freud’s time. The course begins by considering the ways Freud’s cultural and historical surround, as well as the wartime diaspora of the European psychoanalytic community, shaped Freudian and post-Freudian thought. It then focuses on significant schools and theories of psychoanalysis that were developed from the mid 20th century to the present. Through readings of key texts and selected case studies, it explores theorists’ challenges to classical thought and technique, and their reconfigurations, modernizations, and total rejections of central Freudian ideas. The course concludes by looking at contemporary theorists’ moves to integrate notions of culture, concepts of trauma, and findings from neuroscience and attachment research into the psychoanalytic frame.

Spring 2019 Course Type: CPLS Course Code: CLGM GU4150 (4pts.) Go to Registrar
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C.P. CAVAFY & THE POETICS OF DESIRE

Taught by

Instructor: Nikolas Kakkoufa

This course takes C. P. Cavafy’s oeuvre as a departure point in order to discuss desire and the ways it is tied with a variety of topics. We will employ a number of methodological tools to examine key topics in Cavafy’s work such as eros, power, history, and gender. How can we define desire and how is desire staged, thematized, or transmitted through poetry? How does a gay poet write about desired bodies at the beginning of the previous century? What is Cavafy’s contribution to the formation of gay identities in the twentieth century? How do we understand the poet’s desire for an archive? How important is the city for activating desire? How do we trace a poet’s afterlife and how does the desire poetry transmits to readers transform through time? How does literature of the past address present concerns? These are some of the questions that we will examine during this course.

Spring 2019 Course Type: CPLS Course Code: CPLS GR8867 (3pts.) Go to Registrar
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CONTEMPorary CRITICAL THOUGHT

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This seminar will focus, each year, on a different topic central to contemporary critical thought. During the 2015-2016 academic year, for instance, the seminar focused on Michel Foucault’s Collège de France lectures and produced the Foucault 13/13 series. During the 2016-2017 academic year, the seminar focused on critical readings of Friedrich Nietzsche and produced the Nietzsche 13/13 series. During the 2017-2018 academic year, the seminar focused on modalities of uprisings and produced the Uprising 13/13 series. Similar topics will be broached in future years. Please see the CCCCT website for more details on future topics. The graduate student seminar will be structured to frame a series of 13 formal seminars at which two or three guests, from different disciplines, will be invited to discuss the readings and present on the themes of the seminar. Each formal seminar will host specialists from across the disciplines from Columbia University and from outside campus. It will also frame and interrelate with a Paris Reading Group that will run alongside the seminar. The graduate student seminar thus will serve as the vehicle to enrich the formal 13/13 seminars and support the intellectual apparatus that will accompany those formal seminars. It will prepare entries for the blog, host the scholars invited to participate, and prepare questions and comments for the formal seminars. This seminar will function as an advanced graduate research seminar. This is a year-long course (Y course). Columbia GSAS students will be required to take both Fall and Spring semesters of this course. No grade will be issued for the Fall semester, the credits are broken up across both semesters, 4 credits total, 1 in Fall and 3 in Spring. This course co-convenes with LAW L8866 001.

Spring 2019 Course Type: CPLS Course Code: CLEN GU4409 (3pts.) Go to Registrar
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COUNTRY AND CITY IN THE NINETEENTH-CENTURY

Taught by

Instructor: Monica F Cohen

This survey of touchstone nineteenth-century European novels explores the relationship of the realist novel to urban experience and rural identity. If most novels are, in Raymond Williams’s phrase, “knowable communities,” how do fictions of the city and fictions of the country represent individual identity as it shapes and is shaped by physical context? In this light, we consider questions of youth and experience, time and space, work and leisure, men and women, landscape and portraiture, privacy and public life, national culture and cosmopolitanism, realism and romanticism. In class, we juxtapose close readings of novels with analyses of other cultural forms (paintings, operas, popular entertainment, maps) so that we come away with a broader sense of nineteenth-century European culture as well as a working knowledge of one of its most meaningful manifestations, the novel.