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Spring 2017 Course Type: CPLS Course Code: CPLS BC3510 (4pts.) Go to Registrar
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Advanced Workshop Translation

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Instructor: Peter T Connor

 

Prerequisites: CPLT BC 3110 – Introduction to Translation Studies is a recommended prerequisite. A deep immersion in the theory and practice of translation with a focus on translating into English. The first half of the course is devoted to discussing readings in the history of translation theory while translating brief practical exercises; in the second half, translation projects are submitted to the class for critical discussion. The foreign texts for these projects, chosen in consultation with the instructor, will be humanistic, not only literature as conventionally defined (prose fiction and poetry, memoir and travel writing), but also the gamut of text types in the human sciences, including philosophy, history, and ethnography. The aim is not just to translate, but to think deeply about translating, to develop writing practices by drawing on the resources of theory, past and present, and by examining translations written by professionals. In the spring of 2016, the workshop will be offered in two sections by Professor Peter Connor and Professor Emily Sun. The sections will share most of the common readings in the history of translation theory, but Professor Sun’s section will emphasize issues specific to translating East Asia. Enrollment in each workshop is limited to 12 students. Admission into the class is by permission of the instructor. CPLT BC 3011 “Introduction to Translation Studies” is a recommended prerequisite, plus, normally, two advanced courses beyond the language requirement in the language from which you intend to translate. Preference will be given to seniors and to comparative literature majors. Please Email pconnor@barnard.edu by 1 December 2015 with the following information: Name, year of graduation, major, college (BC, CU, etc.); a list of courses you have taken in the language from which you intend to translate; any other pertinent courses you have taken; a brief (max 300 word) statement explaining why you wish to take the workshop (this statement is not required if you have taken or are taking CPLT BC3110 Intro to Translation Studies).

 

 

Spring 2017 Course Type: Related Course Code: CLGR GU4207 (3pts.) Go to Registrar
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AESTHICS UNDER SIEGE-FRANKFURT SCHOOL

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This lecture course works with an expanded notion of the Frankfurt School. The central figures treated are Siegfried Kracauer, Walter Benjamin, and Theodor W. Adorno, but readings also include György Lukács, Ernst Bloch, Bertolt Brecht, and some others. It focuses on aesthetic and political issues in high and mass culture debates in Europe, the Soviet Union, and the U.S. in the inter-war period and post-1945. All readings will be contextualized in relationship to modernism and modernization, Marxism and National Socialism in the first half of the past century. Metropolitan modernism, realism, the historical avant-garde, and mass media culture will be recurring themes throughout the semester, which ends with a coda on the culture of the Cold War.

(COURSE TAUGHT IN ENGLISH)

Spring 2017 Course Type: Joint Course Code: CLPS GU4334 (4pts.) Go to Registrar
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After the Linguistic Turn: Critical Theory, Materialism, and the Domination of Nature

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CPLS GU4334 After the Linguistic Turn: Critical Theory, Materialism and the Domination of Nature

Program: Institute for the Study of Literature and Society

Subfield: Psychoanalytic Studies Program

Course Type: Lecture

 

Course Requirements: Completion of Reading Assignments; Regular attendance; Participation in Class discussions; Undergraduates are required to submit a 7-10 page midterm and a 7-10 page final paper; Graduate students are required to submit a 15-20 page research paper due at the end of the Semester; Students’ grades will be based ¾ on Papers and ¼ on class Participation.

Course Description:

The domination of nature was a central topic for the first generation of the Frankfurt School but as a result of the way that Jürgen Habermas has transformed the project it has virtually disappeared from current discussions in Critical Theory. This is especially striking in light of the fact that the environmental crisis is one of the most urgent issues on our contemporary moral and political agenda.

 

In this course, we will attempt to rehabilitate the domination as a central topos for Critical Theory. To accomplish this, the old Frankfurt School problematic will be re-appropriated and reinterpreted it in terms of recent developments in philosophy, evolutionary biology, primate research and neuropsychology.

Fall 2017 Course Type: Joint Course Code: CLME UN3928 (3pts.) Go to Registrar
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Arabic Prison Writing

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This course studies the genealogy of the prison in Arab culture as manifested in memoirs, narratives, and poems. These cut across a vast temporal and spatial swathe, covering selections from the Quran, Sufi narratives from al-Halllaj oeuvre, poetry by prisoners of war: classical, medieval, and modern. It also studies modern narratives by women prisoners and political prisoners, and narratives that engage with these issues. Arabic prison writing is studied against other genealogies of this prism, especially in the West, to map out the birth of prison, its institutionalization, mechanism, and role. All readings for the course are in English translations.

Fall 2017 Course Type: Joint Course Code: ARCH A4780 (3pts.) Go to Registrar
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Architecture + Human Rights

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This seminar will investigate contemporary trajectories of architecturalresearch and practice that intersect with questions of human rights, notions of democraticpublic space, and spatial politics. We will ask what role the discipline plays (or mightplay) in current debates over questions of political representation, defense, theorganization of territory, surveillance, warfare, political conflict, and cultural heritage aswell as in questions of citizenship, diaspora, humanitarian intervention, and justice.These questions mark out a profoundly fascinating and highly complicated field of study,and there is a growing body of important literature pertaining to them. The seminar willprovide a forum for considering aspects of this literature and practices associated with it,as well as for identifying new lines of research and further critical prospects for thediscipline of architecture.

Spring 2017 Course Type: CPLS Course Code: CPLS GR8342 (4.00pts.) Go to Registrar
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ART/THEORY IN A GLOBAL CONTEXT

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In this Seminar, we will explore the question of ‘globalization’ in the arts, and the new debates to which it has given rise, since 1989, or at the dawn of the 21st century. It is open to qualified students in any discipline concerned with such questions. While it is focused on visual arts and arts institutions, it involves other ‘media’ — film, photography, public art, literature. In conjunction with exhibitions at the Guggenheim and the Met Breuer opening this Spring, we will pay special attention to contemporary art in China and Brazil, but the Seminar welcomes students with interests in other areas or geographies as well. It is intended as a kind of open laboratory and forum about the role that critical theory has played and may yet play in this field, still in the making. Thus the challenges to ‘Euro-centrism’ and the associated problem of ‘critical translation’ will be discussed in terms of the over-riding question: what is ‘transnational citizenship’ today, what role might art and critical thought play in it.

Fall 2017 Course Type: Joint Course Code: CLEN GU4560 (3pts.) Go to Registrar
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Backgrounds to Contemporary Theory

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Spring 2017 Course Type: Joint Course Code: CLPS GU4201 (4pts.) Go to Registrar
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BASIC CONCEPTS: POST FREUD THOUGHT

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Wednesdays 4:10-6pm

This course examines psychoanalytic movements that are viewed either as post-Freudian in theory or as emerging after Freud’s time. The course begins by considering the ways Freud’s cultural and historical surround, as well as the wartime diaspora of the European psychoanalytic community, shaped Freudian and post-Freudian thought. It then focuses on significant schools and theories of psychoanalysis that were developed from the mid 20th century to the present. Through readings of key texts and selected case studies, it explores theorists’ challenges to classical thought and technique, and their reconfigurations, modernizations, and total rejections of central Freudian ideas. The course concludes by looking at contemporary theorists’ moves to integrate notions of culture, concepts of trauma, and findings from neuroscience and attachment research into the psychoanalytic frame.

Fall 2017 Course Type: Joint Course Code: CLEN GU4625 (3pts.) Go to Registrar
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Black Paris

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[Lecture] An introduction to the deep engagement of peoples of African descent with the City of Light throughout the twentieth century. We will take up the full variety of black cultures that have taken shape in dialogue with Paris, including poetry, prose, journals and magazines, music, and film in English and French by African American as well as Francophone Caribbean and African artists and intellectuals. Our investigation will focus on a series of historical moments central to any understanding of black Paris: the efflorescence of the “Jazz Age” in the 1920s (especially through the many Harlem Renaissance artists who spent significant time in France); the emergence of the Négritude movement in the 1930s and 1940s (in relation to other currents such as surrealism, existentialism, and anti-imperialism); the great age of post-World War II expatriate writers such as James Baldwin and Richard Wright; and contemporary black culture in the hip hop era. Throughout the semester, we will discuss the political implications of thinking about black culture through the lens of Paris, whether at the height of the French colonial empire in the interwar period, during the US Civil Rights movement and the Algerian war of independence, or in relation to contemporary debates around religion and immigration. We will be especially attentive to ways Paris can be considered a culture capital of the African diaspora, through what Baldwin called “encounters on the Seine” among black intellectuals and artists from Africa, the Caribbean, and the United States. Readings may include fiction, poetry, and autobiography by authors such as Langston Hughes, Josephine Baker, Claude McKay, Ho Chi Minh, Aimé Césaire, Léopold Sédar Senghor, Jean-Paul Sartre, Cheikh Hamidou Kane, Richard Wright, James Baldwin, William Gardner Smith, Chester Himes, Melvin Van Peebles, Calixthe Beyala, Maryse Condé, and Marie NDiaye; and literary and historical scholarship by Edward Said, Tyler Stovall, Dominic Thomas, Christopher Miller, Pap Ndiaye, and Bennetta Jules-Rosette, among others.

Requirements: weekly short reading responses; one take-home midterm; and one longer final research paper. Reading knowledge of French is useful but not required.

Spring 2017 Course Type: Joint Course Code: CLEN GR6300 (4pts.) Go to Registrar
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BLACK RADICALISM & THE ARCHIVE

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