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Fall 2018 Course Type: CPLS Course Code: CLEN GU4822 (3pts.) Go to Registrar
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19TH CENTURY EUROPEAN NOVEL

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The 19th Century European Novel in the field of the emotions and in the cultural context of the major thinkers and the major historical events of the era.We will examine feelings, emotions, and passions in the novels from the perspectives of affective neuroscience, psychoanalysis, and philosophy in order to lay bare more clearly what is known and believed versus what is unknown, ignored or latent about human emotional reality at this time. Reading: Austen, Kleist (novella), Emily Bronte, Dickens, Dostoevsky, Hardy, D.H. Lawrence. No reading outside of the novels will be required on your part. , Further, my aim is to expand our cultural knowledge of the era by including the conceptual contributions and formative ideas of major 19th century thinkers in my lectures on the novels. Optional Reading of short selections from: Kant, Hegel, Feuerbach, Marx, Darwin, Kierkegaard, Nietzsche, and Freud. Those who wish to read and write in a comparative way or on any of the optional writers will be able to do so in lieu of one or, possibly, two novels.

Fall 2018 Course Type: CPLS Course Code: CPLS GR6368 (4pts.) Go to Registrar
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68 EFFECT IN FRENCH PHILOSOPHY

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Behind this project is a conviction that, for each of the important figures of what is now generally called “French Theory” (a label imported from U.S. Universities), the “May 68 events” in Paris (and elsewhere) represented a surprise and created an interruption in the course of their speculations and researches. This can be identified in some cases in the form of a “self-criticism”, in others as new collaborations and a shift in intellectual “alliances”, but above all in the form of a discovery of new objects and an invention of new terminologies. At stake would be, no doubt, a more direct way of interweaving the “conceptual” and the “political” in philosophy, but more profoundly the very notion of the political (whose traditional definitions, institutional or revolutionary, found themselves devalued in the course of the events), the representation of the “intellectual”, and what Deleuze later would call the “image of thought”. It is this change that we want to address in the seminar, by focusing on a selection of essays that can be read as a “reaction” to the event in the field of theory. They will be presented in the frame of dialogic confrontations around three themes: 1) “Discourse” (Foucault and Lacan); 2) “Desire” (Deleuze-Guattari, Irigaray and “Mouvement de Libération des Femmes”); 3) “Reproduction” (Althusser and Bourdieu-Passeron). This is a limited choice indeed, which nevertheless we hope may help elucidate how philosophers at the time wrote in the conjuncture.

Fall 2018 Course Type: Related Course Code: CLME GU4226 (4pts.) Go to Registrar
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ARABIC AUTOBIOGRAPHY GLOBAL DIMENSIONS

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This course draws a map of Arab thought and culture in its multiple engagements with other cultures. It works globally along two lines: a theoretical one that accommodates conceptualizations of self-narrative in relation to shifting categories of center and margin; and a thematic one that selects a number of Arabic autobiographical texts with strong thematic concerns that cut across multiple cultures. Although Europe sounds at times more conspicuous in early 20th century autobiography, the Afro-Asian and Latin American topographical and historical itinerary and context are no less so, especially in writings we associate with societal and cultural transformations. More than historical accounts, these intellectual itineraries speak for the successes and failures of the secular ideology of the Arab nation-state. They convey the struggle of intellectuals– as self-styled leaders, for an ideal state on the ruins of the past. The course studies a number of autobiographical works; memoirs and reminiscences that are meant to rationalize and reproduce a writer’s experience. Probably self-censored, these serve nevertheless as trajectories for a secular journey rather than one from denial to affirmation. Staunchly established in modernity and its nahdah paradigms, most of these writings are secular itineraries that rarely end in a search for faith. They are the journeys of a generation of Arab intellectuals who are facing many crises, but not the crisis of faith. They provide another look at the making of the Arab intelligentsia- and probably the Afro-Asian and Latin American one, since the early 20th century, and help us discern not only achievements on the level of education and public service , but also the mounting discontent with failures that have been wrapping the formation of the nation state.No prior knowledge of Arabic language is required.

Fall 2018 Course Type: Related Course Code: CLME GU4231 (4pts.) Go to Registrar
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COLD WAR ARAB CULTURE

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This course studies the effects and strategies of the cold war on Arab writing, education, arts and translation, and the counter movement in Arab culture to have its own identities. As the cold war functioned and still functions on a global scale, thematic and methodological comparisons are drawn with Latin America, India and Africa.

Fall 2018 Course Type: CPLS Course Code: CPLS GR6111 (3pts.) Go to Registrar
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COMPARATIVE DIASPORAS & TRANSLATION

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A seminar on the theory and practice of translation from the perspective of comparative diaspora studies, drawing on the key scholarship on diaspora that has emerged over the past two decades focusing on the central issue of language in relation to migration, uprooting, and imagined community. Rather than foregrounding a single case study, the syllabus is organized around the proposition that any consideration of diaspora requires a consideration of comparative and overlapping diasporas, and as a consequence a confrontation with multilingualism, creolization and the problem of translation. The final weeks of the course will be devoted to a practicum, in which we will conduct an intensive workshop around the translation projects of the student participants.

Fall 2018 Course Type: Joint Course Code: 6111 70059

Comparative Diasporas and Translations

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Same as CPLS 6111 GR

A seminar on the theory and practice of translation from the perspective of comparative diaspora studies, drawing on the key scholarship on diaspora that has emerged over the past two decades focusing on the central issue of language in relation to migration, uprooting, and imagined community. Rather than foregrounding a single case study, the syllabus is organized around the proposition that any consideration of diaspora requires a consideration of comparative and overlapping diasporas, and as a consequence a confrontation with multilingualism, creolization and the problem of translation. The final weeks of the course will be devoted to a practicum, in which we will conduct an intensive workshop around the translation projects of the student participants.

Fall 2018 Course Type: CPLS Course Code: CPLS 88906 (4pts.) Go to Registrar
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Craft and Science: Making Objects in the Early Modern World

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ALSO LISTED AS: HISTGR 8906

Chandler 260 , This course studies the materials, techniques, settings, and meanings of skilled craft and artistic practices in the early modern period (1350-1750), in order to reflect upon a series of issues, including craft knowledge and artisanal epistemology; the intersections between craft and science; and questions of historical methodology and evidence in the reconstruction of historical experience. The course will be run as a “Laboratory Seminar,” with discussions of primary and secondary materials, as well as text- and object-based research and hands-on work in a laboratory. One component of the Making and Knowing Project of the Center for Science and Society, this course contributes to the collaborative production of a transcription, English translation, and critical edition of a late sixteenth-century manuscript in French, BnF Ms. Fr. 640. In fall 2018, the course will focus on the cultural context, materials, and techniques of “making impressions” upon a variety of surfaces, including making reliefs for ornament and for printing, and inscribing metal, including engraving and etching. Several entries in the manuscript use what we think of as “print techniques” for metal decoration or making seals and molds, and other entries discuss printers’ type, and make use of prints for image transfer. Students will begin with skill-building exercises in culinary reconstruction, pigment making, and molding, and then, with advice from a visiting “expert maker,” will choose a research focus from the entries in the manuscript that cover such topics as draftsmanship, engraving techniques, print transfer, and other topics that intersect with printing and printmaking. The course will be taught this year only in fall 2018. It is not necessary to have either prior lab experience or French language skills. Please don’t hesitate to contact Pamela Smith, ps2270@columbia.edu, if you have questions.

Fall 2018 Course Type: CPLS Course Code: GR 5040 (4pts.) Go to Registrar
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DECOLONIZING VISION

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Team-taught by Gil Hochberg and Gayatri Gopinath

This interdisciplinary seminar explores the ways in which racial, imperial, and settler colonial regimes of power instantiate regimes of vision that determine what we see, how we see, and how we are seen. We will consider how the legitimacy and authority to rule and regulate particular populations has been inextricably linked to the concomitant power to visually survey these populations and the landscapes they inhabit. We explore how colonial modernity’s abiding legacy is the institution of a way of seeing, and hence knowing, that obscures the intimacies of imperial, racial, and settler colonial projects as they produce racial, gendered, and sexual subjectivities. Most importantly, we identify “decolonial visual practices” that speak to these submerged, co-mingled histories, and that point to their continuing resonance in the present.

Fall 2018 Course Type: Joint Course Code: CLIA 84022 (3pts.)

Diasporas in Italian & Transitional History

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Fall 2018 Course Type: CPLS Course Code: CPLS GU4022 (3pts.) Go to Registrar
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DIASPORAS IN ITALIAN & TRANSITIONAL HISTORY

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Some years ago the word Diaspora referred to Jews and was spelled with a capital D. Today, almost every ethnic group, country, or separatist movement has its diaspora. Usually, these diasporas are presented as pieces of national life scattered here and there, in places far away from the national core. In this seminar, however, we will treat diasporas not as an emblem of national unity but as an expression of diversity, of a multiplicity of loyalties and belongings. By combining history, literature, film, and cultural studies, and by approaching the topic through the lens of transnationalism, we will study topics such as Mobility and Nationalism, Diasporas in Intellectual History, The Mediterranean in Motion, Italian Migration, Mobile Italy and its Colonies, Displacements in the Eastern Mediterranean, Lost Cosmopolitanisms in the Middle East, Emigration from Eastern Europe, and Mediterranean Refugees and Memory. The aim is to turn our gaze away from the territorially defined countries, towards a view of the world in which countries are ship-like territories.