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Fall 2017 Course Type: Related Course Code: HIST GR8917 (4pts.) Go to Registrar
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French Empires

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As in many other European countries in the last fifteen years, the historiography of France has been reshaped by interest in the imperial trajectory of the nation. This class will explore this ‘imperial turn’, and examine its specificity vis-à-vis the historiographies of other European empires. We will examine the questions that have been at the center of the historian’s agenda: what kind of historical processes are revealed (or masked) by the imperial perspective? How do we think historically about the relationships between nation, Republic and empire? How has the ‘imperial turn’ shaped the categories and writing practices of historians? What are the contributions of historians to the understanding of postcolonialism? All readings and discussions are in English.

Fall 2017 Course Type: Joint Course Code: CLPS GU4200 (4pts.) Go to Registrar
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FREUD

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The main work is a close reading of some of Freud’s major early texts including Studies on Hysteria (1895), The Interpretation of Dreams (1900) and Three Essays on the Theory of Sexuality (1905). The emphasis will be on Freud’s understanding of sexuality and mental energy. In the later classes, the reading will include more secondary texts but the emphasis remains on Freud’s writings.

 

Spring 2018 Course Type: Related Course Code: CGTH UN3402 (4pts.) Go to Registrar
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Global 20: Youth in an Interconnected World

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What does it mean to be 20 years old in our rapidly changing, interconnected world? There are more youth (aged 15-25) in the world today than at any other time in history, approaching adulthood as the world confronts seismic shifts in the geopolitical order, in the nature and future of work, and in the ways we connect with each other, express identity, engage politically, and create communities of meaning. What unique challenges and opportunities confront YOU after decades of neoliberal globalization?

“Global 20” students will also participate in a new research project of the Committee on Global Thought, “Youth in a Changing World.” The course will serve as an undergraduate “lab” for the project, and among other involvements, students in the course will help conceive, plan, and take part in a NYC-wide “Youth Think-In” in the Spring 2018 semester.

Please get in touch with Dr. Laura Neitzel (lln5@columbia.edu) with any questions about the course

Spring 2018 Course Type: CPLS Course Code: CPLS GU4401 (4pts.) Go to Registrar
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Global Language Justice & Digital Sphere

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Fall 2017 Course Type: Joint Course Code: CLEN GR6422 (4pts.) Go to Registrar
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GLOBAL SHAKESPEARE

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In the seventeenth century, Shakespeare had already begun to serve as a vehicle of British colonial aspirations, bearing conjoined messages about nation, empire, and civilization, justifying cultural domination, and serving as the touchstone of literacy for new British subjects. At the same time, the multiple geographies of the plays themselves—moving across “The Globe” from Inverness to Libya, Syria to Navarre, the “seacoast of Bohemia” to the never-never-island of The Tempest—helped to destabilize their meaning, revealing “more things on heaven and earth” than British Shakespeare missionaries might ever have dreamt. In the twentieth- and twenty-first centuries, rapidly changing media, the acceleration of global communication, norms of interpretive innovation, and the desire to turn imperial cultural tools against themselves combined not only to multiply the number of Shakespeare productions but to diversify still further their settings and implications. In this course, we will examine adaptations of Shakespeare (primarily on film) by directors working in a variety of media, languages, and places. Close reading of performance and cinematic detail will undergird broader discussions of how media, politics, economics, local, national, and cosmopolitan identities (and more) shape interpretation. (Note: This course fulfills the post-1700 requirement, and may be taken as either a 6000- or 4000-level course.)

Fall 2017 Course Type: Joint Course Code: CLEN GR6837 Go to Registrar
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Global South Atlantic: Comparative Postcolonialisms

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Despite the rise in oceanic, hemispheric, and regional studies in the past decade, and despite the institutional formations of Transatlantic, Black Atlantic, and Diaspora studies, the South Atlantic has not emerged as a particularly potent conceptual or analytical configuration in cultural studies. In “The Global South Atlantic,” we will examine some of the socio-historical linkages and cultural circulations among Latin America, Africa, and the Caribbean; perhaps more importantly, we will also examine both the various ideological and cultural efforts to produce a coherent political and economic image-space of the “South Atlantic” and the forces that have kept it from coming into being or capturing the imagination. “Global” in the course title not only points to the international south-south connections that would constitute a functional system of relations called the “South Atlantic”; it also recognizes that the “South Atlantic” is an imaginary that has been thought and practiced variously from multiple locations.

Our primary literary texts from and about Africa, Latin America, and the Caribbean engage periods and issues that establish and reconfigure relations among peoples around the south Atlantic: charter-company colonialism; the transatlantic slave trade and abolitionism; anti-colonialism and decolonization; tricontinentalism and the non-aligned movement; Cold War dictatorships, resource extraction, and human rights internationalism; indigenous movements and dirty wars; diasporas and exiled intellectuals; transitional justice and truth commissions; regional economic and security communities.

Spring 2018 Course Type: Joint Course Code: CLGR GU4345 (3pts.) Go to Registrar
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Goethe and the Sciences

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This course is also conceived as a more general introduction to theoretical perspectives on the intersections of literature and science. In our close readings we will examine how scientific concepts and ideals such as exactitude, objectivity, or the experiment play comparable roles in Goethe’s literary poetics. Instead of seeing literature and the sciences as delimited disciplines, we will instead scrutinize their a priori assumptions: the poeticization of knowledge, and literature as a form of knowing. In addition, we will study several theoretical texts and discourses as a potential toolbox for interdisciplinary inquiries in the humanities. This course thus also serves as a general introduction to some of the most influential theoretical reflections on literature and science.

Spring 2018 Course Type: Related Course Code: CLEN GU4414 (3pts.) Go to Registrar
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History of Literary Criticism: Plato to Kant

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The principal texts of literary theory from antiquity through the 18th century, including Plato, Aristotle, Horace, Longinus, Augustine, Aquinas, Boccaccio, Sidney, and Kant.

Fall 2017 Course Type: Joint Course Code: ANTH UN2007 Go to Registrar
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Indian and Nigerian Film Cultures

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This class places into comparative focus one of the oldest and one of the newest forms of global cinema outside of the U.S. It introduces and examines these film industries – their platforms, histories, aesthetics, and place in postcolonial life. We will explore how non-western contexts of film production and exhibition offer alternative histories of film. Topics include: aesthetics and genre; space and urbanization; colonialism and post-colonialism, shifting platforms of media exhibition, globalization, the notion of the popular and its relation to art.

Spring 2018 Course Type: Related Course Code: CSER GU4482 (4pts.) Go to Registrar
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Indigenous Peoples:Movements/Rights

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Instructor: Elsa Stamatopoulou

Indigenous Peoples, numbering more that 370 million in some 90 countries and about 5000 groups and representing a great part of the world’s human diversity and cultural heritage, continue to raise major controversies and to face threats to their physical and cultural existence. The main task of this course is to explore the complex historic circumstances and political actions that gave rise to the international Indigenous movement through the human rights agenda and thus also produced a global Indigenous identity on all continents, two intertwined and deeply significant phenomena over the past fifty years. We will analyze the achievements, challenges and potential of the dynamic interface between the Indigenous Peoples’ movement-one of the strongest social movements of our times- and the international community, especially the United Nations system. Centered on the themes laid out in the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (2007), the course will examine how Indigenous Peoples have been contesting and reshaping norms, institutions and global debates in the past 50 years, re-shaping and gradually decolonizing international institutions and how they have contributed to some of the most important contemporary debates, including human rights, development, law, and specifically the concepts of self-determination, governance, group rights, inter-culturality and pluriculturality, gender, land, territories and natural resources, cultural rights, intellectual property, health, education, the environment and climate justice. The syllabus will draw on a variety of academic literature, case studies and documentation of Indigenous organizations, the UN and other intergovernmental organizations as well as States from different parts of the world. Students will also have the opportunity to meet with Indigenous leaders and representatives of international organizations and States and will be encouraged to attend the United Nations Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues. Select short films will be shown and discussed in class.